A novel, based on a New York Times' Modern Love column, based on a story told at The Moth, based on my terrible teenage years.


Praise for LOST STARS


"[A] moving real-life problem novel...Fans of Rainbow Rowell's Eleanor & Park and Stephen Chbosky's The Perks of Being a Wallflower will dig this book."—School Library Journal

"Lost Stars is a novel for anyone who's every grappled with their own place in the universe." —PopSugar, Best YA of 2016

“Davis makes the 1980s shine…[and] makes interesting connections between science and teen angst.”Kirkus Reviews

Carrie may indeed be ‘lost,’ but every reader will find themselves in her as she stumbles through this sharp, aching, and finely-observed coming of age story.”Una LaMarche, author of Unabrow: Misadventures of a Late Bloomer

“Set to the wistful backdrop of the stars and the blasting beat of the '80s, this novel is a triumph.” Kate Hattemer, author of The Vigilante Poets of Selwyn Academy

Lost Stars the rare novel that successfully captures the complexities of family, friendship, and love in equal measure.”Cristina Moracho, author of Althea & Oliver

"Davis does a masterful job of plumbing the depths of Carrie's porcupine heart, evoking an era that may help today's kids to understand their parents, and painting a spot-on portrait of a family nuked by grief. "—Chronogram


Before her older sister, Ginny, died, Carrie was a science nerd, obsessively tracking her beloved Vira comet. But now that Ginny is gone, sixteen-year-old Carrie finds herself within the orbit of Ginny’s friends, a close-knit group of seniors who skip school, obsess over bands (not science), and party hard.  

Fed up with Carrie’s behavior, her father enrolls her in a summer work camp at a local state park. Carrie actually likes the days spent in nature. And when she meets Dean, a guy who likes the real Carrie—astrophysics obsessions and all—she starts to get to the heart of who she is and who she wants to be.